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Madam Girey Question... 
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Broadway Legend / MdN Veteran
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Wow, this topic has been dregged up from the dead.

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Thu Aug 28, 2008 12:35 am
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Tony Winner
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Paula74 wrote:
Brock07 wrote:
However, as Meg got older, what stopped the community from calling HER Madam Giry?


Because Madame is used for married women. If Meg had married, she'd have become Madame So-and-So. She would have remained Mademoiselle Giry as long as she was unmarried, regardless of age.

For example, my favorite French teacher was a very beautiful elderly woman who had never married. She was always Mademoiselle Tribot-Laspierre, regardless of her age.

Besides, the screenplay is fairly specific in noting that it's MADAME Giry, not her daughter, in those scenes. If I could find my copy of the book, I'd quote it.


Sorry for dragging this up BUT:
Madame is used for married women, yes. But also if you are addressing an older lady you may very well call her Madame because otherwise you are implying that she looks like a spinster.

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Mademoiselle Dianne in Picnic at Hanging Rock
Ygraine in Pendragon
Mrs O''Lafferty in Ragged Child


Sat Jan 03, 2009 2:34 pm
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Oli-Ol wrote:
Paula74 wrote:
Brock07 wrote:
However, as Meg got older, what stopped the community from calling HER Madam Giry?


Because Madame is used for married women. If Meg had married, she'd have become Madame So-and-So. She would have remained Mademoiselle Giry as long as she was unmarried, regardless of age.

For example, my favorite French teacher was a very beautiful elderly woman who had never married. She was always Mademoiselle Tribot-Laspierre, regardless of her age.

Besides, the screenplay is fairly specific in noting that it's MADAME Giry, not her daughter, in those scenes. If I could find my copy of the book, I'd quote it.


Sorry for dragging this up BUT:
Madame is used for married women, yes. But also if you are addressing an older lady you may very well call her Madame because otherwise you are implying that she looks like a spinster.


This is what I learned. Once a woman passes a certain age, married or not, you call her Madame, just out of respect.
And, i think its significant that Meg FINDS that figurine and then bids on it.


Fri Oct 09, 2009 7:29 pm
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Tony Winner
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christinadaae wrote:
This is what I learned. Once a woman passes a certain age, married or not, you call her Madame, just out of respect.
And, i think its significant that Meg FINDS that figurine and then bids on it.

That's in the movie. In the stage version she finds the mask.

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Sat Oct 10, 2009 12:31 am
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operafantomet wrote:
christinadaae wrote:
This is what I learned. Once a woman passes a certain age, married or not, you call her Madame, just out of respect.
And, i think its significant that Meg FINDS that figurine and then bids on it.

That's in the movie. In the stage version she finds the mask.


Oh yeah, that is right.
Sorry, been about 10 years!
But they are still bidding on the monkey in the prologue then.?


Sat Oct 10, 2009 7:48 am
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Tony Winner
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christinadaae wrote:
operafantomet wrote:
christinadaae wrote:
This is what I learned. Once a woman passes a certain age, married or not, you call her Madame, just out of respect.
And, i think its significant that Meg FINDS that figurine and then bids on it.

That's in the movie. In the stage version she finds the mask.


Oh yeah, that is right.
Sorry, been about 10 years!
But they are still bidding on the monkey in the prologue then.?

Yup;

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(pics from Copenhagen)

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Sat Oct 10, 2009 10:39 am
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