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READ ME before you ask for audition help
http://musicals.net/forums/viewtopic.php?f=94&t=49866
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Author:  Adie [ Fri Jan 09, 2009 7:03 pm ]
Post subject: 

Ok. as you my know (actually you probably don't)

I've moved to Switerland from Australia and I've just discovered a really nice semi-professional theatre company. They're close by and have a good reputation.
ANYWAY they're putting on West Side Story...in French.
Now I would love the opportunity to be in the show and I really want to get involved in something here BUT
It's in French, I am quite fluent in French and I obviously have to speak it on a regular basis but I am a little bit nervous about this.

So do you guys have any advice on this, have any of you been in a production in a language other than your first?
Do you think volunteering backstage would be a better idea?

Author:  ilovebway [ Fri Jan 09, 2009 8:13 pm ]
Post subject: 

Question: How can you prepare for an audition for a straight play before you are given the scene/monolgue that the audition will be on?

Author:  xxstagekiss [ Sat Jan 10, 2009 3:50 pm ]
Post subject: 

ilovebway wrote:
Question: How can you prepare for an audition for a straight play before you are given the scene/monolgue that the audition will be on?


ANSWER: :wink: If at all possible, get the script and be as familiar with it as possible. If not, research the show to death and see if you can draw any similarities between the characters in the unknown show and characters you're familiar with. It doesn't mean you'll be dead-on ready, but you'll be a lot better off than wandering in with zero clue whatsoever.

Edit, to save a double-post; I know when you walk into an audition, you're supposed to introduce yourself - "Hi, I'm Lexi [last name] and I'm auditioning for the part of [character]." - but what if you're just going to an open call? Is it rude or pretentious to say, for example, "I'm auditioning for the part of Juliet" if it's just a call for all females interested in a role in R&J? That could be a bad example... Let me know if I need to elaborate.

Thanks!
xo Lexi

Author:  ilovebway [ Sun Jan 11, 2009 2:47 pm ]
Post subject: 

^Thanks a bunch Lexi! I've been massively googling/wikipedia-ing this show and found quite a chunk of it online. Hopefully I can get around to seriously be able to sit down and read it thoroughly.

Author:  xxstagekiss [ Sun Jan 11, 2009 3:18 pm ]
Post subject: 

What show is it? Maybe I can help you out. :?

Author:  star2ballie [ Sun Jan 11, 2009 5:51 pm ]
Post subject: 

xxstagekiss wrote:

Edit, to save a double-post; I know when you walk into an audition, you're supposed to introduce yourself - "Hi, I'm Lexi [last name] and I'm auditioning for the part of [character]." - but what if you're just going to an open call? Is it rude or pretentious to say, for example, "I'm auditioning for the part of Juliet" if it's just a call for all females interested in a role in R&J? That could be a bad example... Let me know if I need to elaborate.

Thanks!
xo Lexi


Someone wiser than I can correct me, but I would not say "I am auditioning for ____".

I would just say, "Hi! I'm Lexi ______!"

And then, they might ask you who you're auditioning for...but if not you've saved face. :)

Author:  ilovebway [ Mon Jan 12, 2009 3:35 pm ]
Post subject: 

xxstagekiss wrote:
What show is it? Maybe I can help you out. :?

Our Town. I found a good chunk of it on google books and have found a couple of sides. Hopefully, that's enought to help me get ready.

Author:  WildButterfly [ Fri Mar 27, 2009 11:01 am ]
Post subject:  Hello Dolly Call backs

I am a 42 year old woman who has never been in a musical. BUT it is my dream...it's it everyones??

I just tried out this week for "Hello Dolly". I basically just want to be in the show, so didn't try out for a main role (would be excited to be in chorus). I think I sang horribly at the audition, but did fairly well on reading and dancing. I was told to come back on Saturday for call-backs.

My question is....does everyone who makes "call back" make the musical and then it is just decided where to put everyone?? OR is there possiblity of me being not in the musical at all still? I knwo you probably think I am an idiot...but I am a virgin to this and don't want to get my hopes up too high!

Author:  Gwen [ Fri Mar 27, 2009 11:19 am ]
Post subject: 

^^ WildButterfly:

I'd say it's a dream for a lot of people involved in theater, but not necessarily everyone. The casting process for the theater you auditioned with could be one of several things depending on how it runs. I don't know about that, but here's what I would say:

Not everyone who makes callbacks will necessarily get into the show. Some people who make callbacks are being considered for certain parts. The director might also want to see where some people might fit if they are considering casting them but don't know where to put them yet.

No matter what though, do your best at the callback. Auditions are a good experience even if you don't get in--though I hope you make it! Let us know how it goes!

Break a leg! (That's an expression used in theater meaning "good luck" in case ya didn't know. :) )

Author:  Theater.Geek [ Mon Nov 23, 2009 2:11 pm ]
Post subject: 

My freshman year all my friends got a callback, and two of them were cut anyway. On the other side, I didn't get a callback, so they all thought I wouldn't make it, but it turns out I was given a small speaking role! In this case, I didn't have a callback because the directors already knew where they were going to put me.

Author:  annhharison [ Mon Dec 06, 2010 11:08 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: READ ME before you ask for audition help

audition help is very important in the program or show. first of all audition should have to do preparation for the show. i like too much your idea about audition help such as audition have to read before entering show, research the show online for audition , take help from auditor for any confusion and be pleasant.

Author:  Rorgg [ Mon May 16, 2011 8:20 am ]
Post subject:  Re:

xxstagekiss wrote:
ANSWER: :wink: If at all possible, get the script and be as familiar with it as possible. If not, research the show to death and see if you can draw any similarities between the characters in the unknown show and characters you're familiar with. It doesn't mean you'll be dead-on ready, but you'll be a lot better off than wandering in with zero clue whatsoever.


So you would think. And I subscribe to this as well. I didn't start theatre until later in life, and I think a good chunk of what's turned out to be a surprisingly successful run for me so far has been my philosophy of making up with preparation what I lack in experience.

Which is why I found it surprising last week when I noticed on the audition notice for Twelfth Night I was preparing for a note from the director to pleast not read or see any production of it prior to auditioning.

My reaction was as follows: "jigga-WHA?!"

He explained it that he was planning to use cue scripts and lack of background to force the actors to pay attention to each other. In other words, thought me, he's trying to trick the cast into not sucking. My response was, well, okay, that might work, but I'm going to go with plan B: be prepared, know the material, and just be present in the scenes.

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