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Pete Townshend = Sondheim's Songwriter X? 
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Fresh Face
Fresh Face

Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 5:55 pm
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Post Re: Pete Townshend = Sondheim's Songwriter X?
My guess is he is referring to Hal David, who's only Broadway show is "Promises, Promises" (1968) which was a hit and in fact merited a revival a few months back. His primary writing partner was Burt Bacharach with whom he wrote many of our beloved pop hits of the 60's and 70's (way too many hits to mention here). He had a habit of near rhymes such as rhyming "pneumonia" with "phone ya" in "I'll Never Fall In Love Again" and "San Jose" and "Can Stay" in "Do You Know the Way To San Jose". Hal David was a pop lyricist, he had many pop hits but had only one Broadway entry and it was a hit "Promises, Promises". Seems more likely he is referring to Hal David than Pete Townsend, although I have never seen the quote to which Sondheim refers attributed to Hal David, but certainly a logical guess....


Mon Jan 09, 2012 6:22 pm
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Fresh Face
Fresh Face

Joined: Wed May 29, 2013 7:46 am
Posts: 3
Post Re: Pete Townshend = Sondheim's Songwriter X?
Ever hear the handle "The Singing Aspirin"?
It belongs to Carol Bayer Sager.
Her one hit musical wonder is They're Playing Our Song.
Her one flop was Georgy based on the movie Georgy Girl.
I remember reading a quote of hers expressing just what Songwriter X does, around the time of "Heartbreaker," a song she wrote which was recorded by Dolly Parton, also a prolific songwriter who wrote a musical and who also uses deficient rhyme ("told us"/"gold dust"). Her attention to other details in her lyrics kind of makes up for it ("tumble out of bed and stumble to the kitchen/pour myself a cup of ambition") ("she lived up on the mountain eleven miles or so from town/with a one-eyed cat named Wink, a billy goat and a blue tick hound"). Just to name two examples.
Was I the only hippie into musicals? My cronies would mindlessly accept poor rhyme (which really = poor craftsmanship), but when you've been listening to musicals since age ten, only true rhyme sounds true, true?
But it sadly looks like the standards in musicals are lowering and poor rhyme is here to stay (like the cliche).


Wed May 29, 2013 8:11 am
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