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LOVE NEVER DIES Production Details 
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Post LOVE NEVER DIES Production Details --> Rock Opera?
Jekkienumber24601 wrote:
As songs I love both "The Phantom of the Opera" and "The Beauty Underneath". I wish the rest of both scores had some more rock opera moments. I think Jesus Christ Superstar is still one of his best, followed by Sunset Boulevard.

The only problem with that idea is that neither of the "Phantom" shows (or Sunset Boulevard for that matter) are rock operas. Jesus Christ Superstar is, so that's a different matter completely.

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Fri Apr 09, 2010 8:30 am
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Sunset Boulevard definately not. Phantom IS a Pop Opera. Keeping in mind that pop is not a style of music, pop literally means what's popular at the time. At the time classical and 80's rock were popular. At now Beauty Underneath fits into what it popular....only better cause it's story-driven...you can't sing it out of context of the musical :-)

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Fri Apr 09, 2010 1:04 pm
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Post Musical Theatre Genres
Jekkienumber24601 wrote:
Phantom IS a Pop Opera.

No, it isn't. It subscribes to none of the conventions of rock opera. If it did, the use of pop music styles in the score would not be problematic. However, it does not present itself using the language of that sub-genre of musical theatre.

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Fri Apr 09, 2010 8:07 pm
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Post Re: Musical Theatre Genres
RainbowJude wrote:
Jekkienumber24601 wrote:
Phantom IS a Pop Opera.

No, it isn't. It subscribes to none of the conventions of rock opera. If it did, the use of pop music styles in the score would not be problematic. However, it does not present itself using the language of that sub-genre of musical theatre.


Humbly asking, what are the conventions of rock opera?

What would the language of that sub-genre of musical theater be like?


Fri Apr 09, 2010 11:50 pm
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I have heard the original "Papers" (in place of Notes) from Sydmonton, and it had more of a pop/rock strain to it.


Sat Apr 10, 2010 12:27 am
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It's all sung with little bits of spoken dialogue. It was the popular music at the time. I suppose you're also going to say that Les Miserables is not a pop opera, whilst the composers themselves classify it as that.

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Tue Apr 13, 2010 9:12 am
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I saw the show a little over a week ago, so for what it's worth, here are my thoughts...I'm not really concerned with how characters are portrayed vs how they are in the original or the book (or any follow-up books), just how they appear in the show (just so you know!)

Technically I thought it was stunning. Visually it was beautiful and the use of projection was fantastic, particularly the opening sequence. I liked the set designs and their simplicity - it felt quite minimal in places and I really like that. Nice use of a revolve too - it wasn't unnecessary and fitted in very well. Costumes and lighting I didn't really notice, which for me is a good thing - if I don't see them sticking out then they're doing their jobs. Some of the special effect costumes were very cleverly done and very effective. It also sounded great - very clear and very well engineered.

The cast I thought were all excellent. Ramin Karimloo did stand out for me - he was superb and vocally didn't put a foot wrong all night. Good ensemble work and all the leads were well up to the demands of their parts.

The show itself I felt is rather unevenly written - and it seemed to me that Raoul was the most unevenly written character of all. I spent the first half disliking him intensely, and then the second half feeling sorry for him, with no real reason for his change of character. Also musically it seemed all over the place to me - it never settled into any one particular style and I found that quite difficult - Beauty Underneath felt like a song from a completely different show as far as I was concerned. The major issue I had was that for me "Till I Hear You Sing" was the best song in the show - and that is in scene 2 of Act 1, so it was downhill from there. I did like the way that ALW avoided using the "big" themes from the original but tied it in every now and again with a phrase or two that was recognisably from POTO.

I feel like the show had pacing problems too - Act 1 in particular felt slow to me, Act 2 wasn't quite so bad. I think maybe the difficulty here is that in POTO a lot happens, but in LND there really isn't a huge amount of action, and you can't help but compare them.

So, in a nutshell, I think it's mixed as a show - some good aspects and some not-so-good aspects.

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Tue May 18, 2010 2:11 am
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LND has one quality that not every show has. Its fans can go back every couple of weeks and see something different. They just put in a whole new scene and changed the whole opening, according to Ramin K. in an interview. I don't know any details.


Sat May 29, 2010 10:56 pm
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Pastiche wrote:
LND has one quality that not every show has. Its fans can go back every couple of weeks and see something different. They just put in a whole new scene and changed the whole opening, according to Ramin K. in an interview. I don't know any details.

Not sure that is a positive thing... Seems like they should have done a round of two of workshopping before opening in West End. Right now they're charging lots of bucks for an unfinished show.

And basically all reviewers, be it professionals or regular goers, points out that the endless end scene is the show's biggest issue. When will they ever work on that?

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Mon May 31, 2010 8:49 am
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The end scene may be the biggest "book / score" issue, but the biggest production issue is the scenography which was so horrible that I can't even begin to mention all its flaws! It is the worst scenography I've ever seen.


Mon May 31, 2010 11:00 am
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kiwitechgirl wrote:
Visually it was beautiful and the use of projection was fantastic, particularly the opening sequence. I liked the set designs and their simplicity - it felt quite minimal in places and I really like that. Nice use of a revolve too - it wasn't unnecessary and fitted in very well.


High-baritonne wrote:
[T]he biggest production issue is the scenography which was so horrible that I can't even begin to mention all its flaws! It is the worst scenography I've ever seen.


Fascinatingly conflictiong opinions here...

Tell me more!

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Mon May 31, 2010 11:59 am
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Well, I will start by saying this: This stage-musical wanted so badly to become a move so it decided to use an in-depth feature which made almost every out-door setting have a vanishing point to the far right of the stage. This was really cool when we just saw the set design without anyone in it, but once a woman emerged from the shadows walking from the vanishing point to the front of the stage it really looked like she was shrinking as she moved forwards. It is the most dreadful scenography attempt ever, and the creator could not have been well-educated. Even I, a 1. year drama student have learned that there is a huge difference between movie scenography and a stage scenography.

Anyone who ever attempts such a foolish thing must have failed in mathematics at school.


Mon May 31, 2010 3:56 pm
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