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what does the song "any dream will do" mean? 
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What are the 1969 lyrics?


Mon Jun 08, 2009 10:30 am
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As soon as I find them, I'll throw them here. They used to be on an ALW fan site that is now-defunct.

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Wed Jun 10, 2009 8:49 pm
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I've always thought of it as a way to take a well known bible story and make it into a musical that everyone can relate to. By putting this song in it suggests that the musical is about following your dreams and not about religion.


Tue Aug 18, 2009 8:21 pm
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Found the 1969 "Any Dream Will Do" lyrics!

Quote:
When evening falls
I draw the curtain
I know for certain
What I want to do
Do not disturb
If I am weeping
While I am sleeping
Any dream will do

My dreams are clouds
With golden lining
Bright colors shining
Wonderful and new
I drift away
Where the world can't find me
Leave it all behind me
Any dream will do

A crash of drums
A flash of light
My golden dreams
Flew out of sight
The colors faded into darkness
I was left alone

May I return
To the beginning
The light is dimming
And the dream is too
And it's because
Each time I wake up
My world just breaks up
Any dream will do


Okay, I know what you're saying. Gib, why are you such a champion of these lyrics? They're tacky! They read like a rush job! Like something Tim wrote in the taxi on the way to Andrew's after having promised he already had a lyric finished!

But...there's a reason it works as character development, to me. It helps develop the character journey of Joseph from this bratty young kid with a seemingly divine ability to a young man in control of his (and ultimately his family's) destiny. The finale lyrics (as currently used at the top of the show in true Jason Donovan pop single form) sound too self-assured, too confident, too much like he's already learned his lesson, to be at the top of the show.

These lyrics, for one, on the other hand, are self-centered. They present this image of Joseph as a (no doubt very bratty, Steven Pimlott agreed with me anyway) kid who just wants to be left alone to dream, who doesn't want any responsibility, which makes it all the more amazing when he suddenly takes on one massive responsibility after another in Egypt. He also describes his dreams, how they take him away from the world surrounding him, which incidentally explains why he's able to recall them so well (i.e., if his dreams are an escape from the world around him, he'll be able to recall and interpret them with regularity). These are the lyrics that belong at the start of the character journey suggested for Joseph by the meager material that makes up the show.

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Sat Aug 29, 2009 10:41 am
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I saw a Joseph once when the openign ANy Dream was performed simply with voice and a ukelele backing, similar to the songs "Blue Red and Grey" or "Somewhere Over The Rainbow/Wonderful World" by The Who or Israel respectively.

It didn't change it much, but by taking away the over-produced, self-confident backing music, it left the song standing alone with its naivete intact.

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Sat Aug 29, 2009 10:45 am
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Brother Marvin Hinten, S. wrote:
But...there's a reason it works as character development, to me. It helps develop the character journey of Joseph from this bratty young kid with a seemingly divine ability to a young man in control of his (and ultimately his family's) destiny. The finale lyrics (as currently used at the top of the show in true Jason Donovan pop single form) sound too self-assured, too confident, too much like he's already learned his lesson, to be at the top of the show.

These lyrics, for one, on the other hand, are self-centered. They present this image of Joseph as a (no doubt very bratty, Steven Pimlott agreed with me anyway) kid who just wants to be left alone to dream, who doesn't want any responsibility, which makes it all the more amazing when he suddenly takes on one massive responsibility after another in Egypt. He also describes his dreams, how they take him away from the world surrounding him, which incidentally explains why he's able to recall them so well (i.e., if his dreams are an escape from the world around him, he'll be able to recall and interpret them with regularity). These are the lyrics that belong at the start of the character journey suggested for Joseph by the meager material that makes up the show.



Cool :D I'd like to see a production that uses those lyrics at the beginning and see how it comes across. (Would it be legal to use them?)

I do still like my old idea of Joseph making his entrance as a spirit looking back on his life, then taking the audience back in time to tell them the story. But of course, there's less character development in that scenario.


Sat Aug 29, 2009 11:12 am
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Vanessa20 wrote:
Brother Marvin Hinten, S. wrote:
But...there's a reason it works as character development, to me. It helps develop the character journey of Joseph from this bratty young kid with a seemingly divine ability to a young man in control of his (and ultimately his family's) destiny. The finale lyrics (as currently used at the top of the show in true Jason Donovan pop single form) sound too self-assured, too confident, too much like he's already learned his lesson, to be at the top of the show.

These lyrics, for one, on the other hand, are self-centered. They present this image of Joseph as a (no doubt very bratty, Steven Pimlott agreed with me anyway) kid who just wants to be left alone to dream, who doesn't want any responsibility, which makes it all the more amazing when he suddenly takes on one massive responsibility after another in Egypt. He also describes his dreams, how they take him away from the world surrounding him, which incidentally explains why he's able to recall them so well (i.e., if his dreams are an escape from the world around him, he'll be able to recall and interpret them with regularity). These are the lyrics that belong at the start of the character journey suggested for Joseph by the meager material that makes up the show.



Cool :D I'd like to see a production that uses those lyrics at the beginning and see how it comes across. (Would it be legal to use them?)

I do still like my old idea of Joseph making his entrance as a spirit looking back on his life, then taking the audience back in time to tell them the story. But of course, there's less character development in that scenario.


I don't know where these lyrics have come from, but I have the 1969 recording, and the lyrics are exactly the same as the ones used now.


Wed Sep 02, 2009 4:28 pm
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These lyrics are for a version that was recorded and released in 1969 as a pop single by an act called "Christopher." You won't find them on the '69 album.

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Wed Sep 02, 2009 4:37 pm
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Dvarg wrote:
It doesn't mean anything.

Initially it was a pop single with nonsense text that was tweaked slightly, so that it gives a slight impression of having something to do with the show.


I don't know where you get this from. It was written in 1968, and it wasn't a pop single until 1991.


Wed Sep 02, 2009 4:40 pm
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See above, and check Tim Rice's autobiography for confirmation. It was.

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Wed Sep 02, 2009 4:40 pm
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Brother Marvin Hinten, S. wrote:
See above, and check Tim Rice's autobiography for confirmation. It was.



Ok I have now read up on it. What was confusing me is that Dvarg's post implied that the 1969 single was the original, which it most certainly was not. The original lyric is the one still used in the show today. As shown here.


http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=6133


Wed Sep 02, 2009 5:04 pm
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