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What's with "Now I Have Everything"?
http://musicals.net/forums/viewtopic.php?f=28&t=38861
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Author:  Harmonia_G [ Sun May 15, 2005 5:49 pm ]
Post subject:  What's with "Now I Have Everything"?

I love Fiddler on the Roof. I think that it is one of the best musicals ever. My only problem with it is the ever so awkward song sang by Perchik "Now I Have Everything." I just think that this is a bad song, and it is so out of place in a musical full of great songs. Every other song has so much purpose, and then this song pops up out of nowhere and it does absolutely nothing for Perchik or Hodel. Plus, what's with the last note? Does anyone else feel this way about this song?

Author:  Mark Walton [ Mon May 16, 2005 2:35 pm ]
Post subject: 

I disagree; I like the song. Perchik expresses his happiness at having found in Hodel some companionship in his nomadic life. Hodel in turn has found the man she loves, who has opened her eyes (and her father's) to new ideas. Julia Migenes-Johnson and the late Bert Convy did it very well on the original Broadway CD. The song was cut from the movie, see the thread "Cut Songs" http://musicals.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=38520 for my explanation.

Author:  Buff Daddy [ Wed May 18, 2005 3:47 pm ]
Post subject: 

As a former Perchik, I must defend my song :wink:

The song expresses the change in Perchik - from being single minded toward revolution to having a purpose and reason to fight for revolution. It declares Perchik's love for Hodel and Hodel's love for Perchik. In the first act, they are often having "battles" even from when they first meet.

Yeah, the last note is different, but it's not boring! :? :wink:

Buff :D

Author:  Pancakes9117 [ Thu May 19, 2005 3:39 pm ]
Post subject:  I AGREE

The song itself was put in a excelent place and the lyrics of the song are good. to me personally the composition is not the most fantastic thing and is definatly not one of the best songs in the show

Author:  Musicalfreak355 [ Thu May 26, 2005 4:44 am ]
Post subject: 

It's kind of funny because during one of the rershals when the director was giving notes he told our Perchik and Hodel that after seeing them perform the song that he lever liked and felt was out of place he understands the meaning...
Maybe you just haven't "felt" it yet... :wink:

Author:  actor05 [ Sun Sep 04, 2005 9:55 pm ]
Post subject: 

I, as well must defend my song! (As i have played Perchik)

I agree with most of the people here who have responded. The song talks about this man who thought his life was perfect, but actually he realized his was nothing until he found his love. I think the song also, is Perchik and Hodel's vow of love.

That's why I really don't like Motel's song. I think that song really has no connection to Fiddler whatsoever.

Author:  MaryMag [ Mon Sep 05, 2005 7:57 pm ]
Post subject: 

But you guys have to admit that (musically) the song is way different from the rest of the songs, right?

Lyrically, the song expresses Perchik's position well. However, it lacks the 'ethnic' aspect that flavor all the other songs. (Ethnic is a stupid adjective but I'm gonna stick with it.) The songs the Jews sing are clearly Jewish; they either use Jewish scales or contain lots of references to the Old Testament ("Miracle of Miracles") and "L'Chaim" sounds a bit Russian when the Russians come in. Perchik's song shows no distinguishable cultural influences in terms of musicality. It is the most 'Broadway' of the songs I think.

But I do like it! I just wish they would have included some aspects of Jewish music in it. And his last E (I think that's what it is) is weird. I'm playin Hodel right now and it's kind of harsh on the ears when I'm that close to him.

Author:  Mark Walton [ Tue Sep 06, 2005 2:53 pm ]
Post subject: 

actor05 wrote:
That's why I really don't like Motel's song. I think that song really has no connection to Fiddler whatsoever.


For Motel, "the most miraculous one of all" was - to his own surprise as much as anyone else's - he finally found the courage to stand up to Tevye, of whom he was previously terrified, and win Tzeitel's hand in marriage. That was a turning point for him; he went from being widely dismissed as a nobody to a respected member of the community in his own right - especially after becoming a father and getting the sewing machine for which he had long scrimped and saved. Tevye developed a deep affection and respect for Motel, coming to regard him as almost like the son he never had. When he was packing up to leave Anatevka, Tevye's remark "This Motel is a person!" was uttered with a conviction that, not long ago, he never would have believed possible, and their final parting was warm. Of the 3 sons-in-law, Motel is probably the closest to Tevye himself temperamentally, being devout, hard-working, and poor.

One of the worst Motels ever was Leonard Frey in the movie. He had a nervous laugh that he never fully shook free of, and often came across as such a twit that I think John Cleese (of Monty Python) couldn't have done worse. In his first attempt to ask Tevye for Tzeitel's hand, just before "Sabbath Prayer", he came dangerously close to blowing everything, by playing cat-and-mouse with Tevye.

Author:  Jennifer Lynn [ Wed Sep 07, 2005 12:12 pm ]
Post subject: 

Mark Walton wrote:
actor05 wrote:
That's why I really don't like Motel's song. I think that song really has no connection to Fiddler whatsoever.


For Motel, "the most miraculous one of all" was - to his own surprise as much as anyone else's - he finally found the courage to stand up to Tevye, of whom he was previously terrified, and win Tzeitel's hand in marriage. That was a turning point for him; he went from being widely dismissed as a nobody to a respected member of the community in his own right - especially after becoming a father and getting the sewing machine for which he had long scrimped and saved. Tevye developed a deep affection and respect for Motel, coming to regard him as almost like the son he never had. When he was packing up to leave Anatevka, Tevye's remark "This Motel is a person!" was uttered with a conviction that, not long ago, he never would have believed possible, and their final parting was warm. Of the 3 sons-in-law, Motel is probably the closest to Tevye himself temperamentally, being devout, hard-working, and poor.

One of the worst Motels ever was Leonard Frey in the movie. He had a nervous laugh that he never fully shook free of, and often came across as such a twit that I think John Cleese (of Monty Python) couldn't have done worse. In his first attempt to ask Tevye for Tzeitel's hand, just before "Sabbath Prayer", he came dangerously close to blowing everything, by playing cat-and-mouse with Tevye.


Mmmm...I tend to disagree. I loved it when he finally just put everything he had into shouting, "THAT'S TRUE, REB TEVYE, BUT EVEN A POOR TAILOR IS ENTITLED TO SOME HAPPINESS!" And the way everyone--Motel included!--looks shocked at Motel's new resolve. And Motel's utter conviction (though his nervousness is still apparent) in taking Tzeitel's hand and stating, "I promise you, Reb Tevye, your daughter will not starve!"

There's a funny story about that scene on Broadway. It may have been Austin Pendelton, the original Motel, that told it (before he helped Doc Hopper chase down Kermit, that is). Zero Mostel was nagging him to do "even a poor tailor is entitled to some happiness!" with the right amount of vehemence. Austin got so sick of Zero's pushing that he ended up shouting the line right in Zero's face. And Zero whispered, "That's it...you got it!"

Author:  Buff Daddy [ Wed Sep 07, 2005 3:28 pm ]
Post subject: 

MaryMag wrote:
But you guys have to admit that (musically) the song is way different from the rest of the songs, right?


I see what you mean, and tend to agree. It's like "the ballad we had to have" and the start of Act 2.

Buff :D

Author:  Mark Walton [ Thu Sep 08, 2005 7:16 pm ]
Post subject: 

Jennifer Lynn wrote:
Mmmm...I tend to disagree. I loved it when he finally just put everything he had into shouting, "THAT'S TRUE, REB TEVYE, BUT EVEN A POOR TAILOR IS ENTITLED TO SOME HAPPINESS!" And the way everyone--Motel included!--looks shocked at Motel's new resolve. And Motel's utter conviction (though his nervousness is still apparent) in taking Tzeitel's hand and stating, "I promise you, Reb Tevye, your daughter will not starve!"

There's a funny story about that scene on Broadway. It may have been Austin Pendelton, the original Motel, that told it (before he helped Doc Hopper chase down Kermit, that is). Zero Mostel was nagging him to do "even a poor tailor is entitled to some happiness!" with the right amount of vehemence. Austin got so sick of Zero's pushing that he ended up shouting the line right in Zero's face. And Zero whispered, "That's it...you got it!"


Thanks for the story about Austin Pendleton, I didn't know that. He's now 65, still a very active actor, and the second-ranking survivor of Fiddler's original Broadway cast, after Beatrice Arthur (Yente).

I don't disagree with you about Motel's line about a poor tailor being entitled to some happiness; Leonard Frey didn't flub that one in the movie. Tzeitel put it into his head just before the Sabbath Prayer, after answering his "I'm only a poor tailor" with "And I'm only the daughter a poor milkman". Tevye never admitted that he was little better off than Motel, but did admit, however reluctantly, that Motel was an honest, hard worker -not unlike himself, an analogy he never really made.

Author:  Kcuhc_2891 [ Mon Sep 19, 2005 2:05 pm ]
Post subject: 

Quote:
One of the worst Motels ever was Leonard Frey in the movie. He had a nervous laugh that he never fully shook free of, and often came across as such a twit that I think John Cleese (of Monty Python) couldn't have done worse. In his first attempt to ask Tevye for Tzeitel's hand, just before "Sabbath Prayer", he came dangerously close to blowing everything, by playing cat-and-mouse with Tevye.


I liked Leonard Frey. He has the naivity and nervousness that the character needs. But I thought John Cariani was better.

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